EconStor >
Cornell University >
Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University >
Staff Papers, Dyson School, Cornell University >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/23485
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPreszler, Trent L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-29T16:08:25Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-29T16:08:25Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/23485-
dc.description.abstractThe finest restaurants in Portland, Oregon, feature primarily Oregon-produced wines. Likewise, strong regional pride dictates that most fine restaurants in Seattle carry predominantly Washington wines; and the same generalization can be made about the presence of California wines in San Francisco. Wines produced in the State of New York (NY), however, have traditionally been shut out of the upscale New York City (NYC) market. Industry leaders have spearheaded a surge in the quality of New York?s vinifera wines in the past quarter century, and are now questioning more seriously why their products do not enjoy broad acceptance in what is the biggest, most important, and closest urban market for the NY wine industry.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStaff paper / Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management 2003,01en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwWeinen_US
dc.subject.stwMarketingen_US
dc.titleMarketing New York Wine in New York Cityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn364234830en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:Staff Papers, Dyson School, Cornell University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
sp0301.pdf389.66 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.