Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/22480
Authors: 
Strulik, Holger
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Diskussionspapiere des Fachbereichs Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Universität Hannover 368
Abstract: 
A neoclassical growth model is augmented by a corporate sector, financial intermediation, and a set of tax rates. In this setting, capital structure is determined by the interplay between an advantage of debt finance resulting from the tax system and a disadvantage resulting from asymmetric information and the entailed agency costs. Effects of capital tax reforms are investigated with a special focus on the credit channel that operates through the finance decision of firms. The theoretical part of the article derives which financial and real effects of private and corporate income tax policies can be expected. Using a calibration with U.S. data, the applied part demonstrates that tax cuts cause significant adjustments of capital structure. Nevertheless, the credit channel creates relatively small effects of tax reforms on consumption, investment, and growth.
Subjects: 
Tax Reform
Corporate Finance
Agency Costs
Economic Growth
JEL: 
H30
O16
E62
E44
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
260.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.