Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21492
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorErmisch, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrancesconi, Marcoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:22:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:22:54Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/21492-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the links between the socio-economic position of parents and the socio-economic position of their offspring and, through the marriage market, the socioeconomic position of their offspring?s parents-in-law. Using the Goldthorpe-Hope score of occupational prestige as a measure of status and samples drawn from the British Household Panel Survey 1991-1999, we find that the intergenerational elasticity is around 0.2 for menand between 0.17 and 0.23 for women. On average, the intragenerational correlation is lower, and of the order of 0.15 to 0.18, suggesting that the returns to human capital, which is transmitted across generations by altruistic parents, contribute more to social status than assortative mating in the marriage market. Substantially higher estimates are reported whenmeasurement error is accounted for. We also find strong nonlinearities, whereby both inter- and intra-generational elasticities tend to increase with parental status. We offer four possible explanations for this finding, three of which – one based on mean-displacement shifts in the occupational prestige distribution, another based on life-cycle effects and the third based ondifferential measurement errors – do not find strong support in our data. The fourth explanation is based on the notion of intergenerational transmission of social capital and intellectual capital. The evidence supports the idea that richer parents are likely to have a larger and more valuable stock of both social capital and intellectual capital to pass on to their children.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion paper series |x465en_US
dc.subject.jelI20en_US
dc.subject.jelD64en_US
dc.subject.jelD31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ12en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordIntergenerational linksen_US
dc.subject.keywordmarriage marketen_US
dc.subject.keywordassortative matingen_US
dc.subject.keywordGoldthorpe-Hope occupational prestige indexen_US
dc.subject.keywordsocial and intellectual capitalen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Mobilitäten_US
dc.subject.stwGenerationenbeziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwFamilienökonomiken_US
dc.subject.stwHumankapitalen_US
dc.subject.stwErwerbsstatusen_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.titleIntergenerational Social Mobility and Assortative Mating in Britainen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn845476653en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
442.8 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.