EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21286
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStefanová Lauerová, Janaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTerrell, Katherineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:21:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/21286-
dc.description.abstractPost-communist labor markets provide an interesting laboratory since unemployment rates grew from zero to double digits and gender differences began to vary greatly across these countries. We provide the first systematic analysis of the determinants of the gender unemployment gap in the Czech Republic using a method that decomposes unemployment rates into transition probabilities (flows) between labor market states, which we calculate using Labor Force Survey data. We extend the analysis to other post-communist economies by evaluating the flows available from existing studies with the decomposition framework. We further examine the flows in the Czech Republic by estimating gender-specific multinomial logit models to learn which factors (demographic, regional, cyclical) other than gender and marital status affect unemployment. We find that women?s lower probability of exiting unemployment for a job explains the lion?s share of the gender gap in the unemployment rates in the Czech Republic and the other post-communist countries for which studies exist. This is also the principal factor explaining married women?s higher unemployment rates compared to married men in the Czech Republic. On the other hand, single men and women?s rates are higher than married men and women?s because they are twice as likely to lose/leave a job for unemployment. We find that age and education are systematically important in explaining flows of both men and women in all these economies, as it is in the more developed industrial economies. The less educated are more likely to be laid off or quit and less likely to find a job. Whereas younger individuals are more likely to be laid off or quit, they are also more likely to find a job.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion paper series 600en_US
dc.subject.jelJ48en_US
dc.subject.jelJ64en_US
dc.subject.jelP20en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordunemploymenten_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordtransition probabilitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordflow analysisen_US
dc.subject.keywordpost-communist economiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordCzech Republicen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitslosigkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwGeschlechten_US
dc.subject.stwFrauenarbeitslosigkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwÜbergangswirtschaften_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwTschechische Republiken_US
dc.titleExplaining Gender Differences in Unemployment with Micro Data on Flows in Post-Communist Economiesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn359655505en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp600.pdf512.31 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.