EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21207
  
Title:Can Vocational Education Improve the Wages of Minorities and Disadvantaged Groups? Minorities and Disadvantaged Groups?Minorities and Disadvantaged Groups?The Case of Israel PDF Logo
Authors:Neuman, Shoshana
Ziderman, Adrian
Issue Date:2001
Series/Report no.:IZA Discussion paper series 348
Abstract:There is a considerable empirical literature which compares wage levels of workers who have studied at secondary vocational schools with wages of workers who took academic schooling. In general, vocational education does not lead to higher wages. However, in some countries where labor markets are characterized by employment growth, skill shortages and a good match between vocational skills and available jobs, the record of vocational schooling has been more positive. Israel constitutes a case in point. However, little attention has been given to examining the success of vocational education in raising the wages of various subsections of the labor force, in particular of minorities and disadvantaged groups. In this paper, we examine the efficacy of vocational education in raising the wage levels of four such groups: recent immigrants, Jews of Eastern origin, Israeli Arabs and females. The results are mixed, differing from group to group, thus justifying our approach of examining the impact of vocational schooling on finer breakdowns of the population of secondary school completers.
Subjects:Wage differentials
human capital
gender
ethnicity
immigration
Arabs
vocational education.
JEL:J24
J21
J61
J16
J44
J15
J31
I21
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp348.pdf219.31 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21207

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.