EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21038
  
Title:Overeducation, Undereducation, and the Theory of Career Mobility PDF Logo
Authors:Büchel, Felix
Mertens, Antje
Issue Date:2000
Series/Report no.:IZA Discussion paper series 195
Abstract:The theory of career mobility (Sicherman and Galor 1990) claims that wage penalties for overeducated workers are compensated by better promotion prospects. A corresponding empirical test by Sicherman (1991), using mobility to an occupation with higher human capital requirements as an indicator for upward career mobility, was successful and confirmed by Robst (1995. However, both tests include controls for the opposite phenomenon of undereducation and report ambiguous results without offering sound theoretical explanations. Estimating random effects probits with data from the German Socio-Economic Panel we show that part of the problem is neglecting the base effect of the occupational starting position. This severely affects the stability of the results, because career mobility is mainly observed from jobs with low qualification requirements. Moreover, we show that Sicherman?s indicator for upward career mobility and similar indicators as moving to a higher status position are not valid indicators. When using relative wage growth (and this is the strategic variable underlying the theory of Sicherman and Galor) overeducated workers are found to experience clearly lower relative wage growth rates than correctly allocated workers; the contrary is the case for undereducated workers. This pattern of results severely jeopardizes the career mobility model and can be better explained using signaling and segmentation theories. Based on the well-known positive correlation of access to training and upward career mobility the plausibility of our results is supported by the finding that access to informal and formal on-the-job training is relatively worse for overeducated and better for undereducated workers.
Subjects:Qualification mismatch
overeducation
career mobility
wage change
JEL:J31
I21
J62
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp195.pdf184.5 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21038

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.