Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20787
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFrijters, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaisken-DeNew, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShields, Michael A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:16:45Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/20787-
dc.description.abstractThe socio-economic gradient in health remains a controversial topic in economics and othersocial sciences. In this paper we develop a new duration model that allows for unobservedpersistent individual-specific health shocks and provides new evidence on the roles of socioeconomiccharacteristics in determining length of life using 19-years of high-quality paneldata from the German Socio-Economic Panel. We also contribute to the rapidly growingliterature on life satisfaction by testing if more satisfied people live longer. Our results clearlyconfirm the importance of income, education and marriage as important factors indetermining longevity. For example, a one-log point increase in real household monthlyincome leads to a 12% decline in the probability of death. We find a large role for unobservedhealth shocks, with 5-years of shocks explaining the same amount of the variation in lengthof life as all the other observed individual and socio-economic characteristics (with theexception of age) combined. Individuals with a high level of life satisfaction when initiallyinterviewed live significantly longer, but this effect is completely due to the fact that lesssatisfied individuals are typically less healthy. We are also able to confirm the findings ofprevious studies that self-assessed health status has significant explanatory power inpredicting future mortality and is therefore a useful measure of morbidity. Finally, we suggestthat the duration model developed in this paper is a useful tool when analyzing a wide-rangeof single-spell durations where individual-specific shocks are likely to be important.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonn-
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion paper series |x1488en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.jelI1en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordincomeen_US
dc.subject.keywordeducationen_US
dc.subject.keywordmarriageen_US
dc.subject.keywordlife satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.keywordshocksen_US
dc.subject.keywordmortalityen_US
dc.subject.keyworddurationen_US
dc.subject.stwSterblichkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwLebensqualitäten_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwEheen_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwDeutschlanden_US
dc.subject.stwLebenszufriedenheiten_US
dc.titleSocio-Economic Status, Health Shocks, Life Satisfaction and Mortality : Evidence from an Increasing Mixed Proportional Hazard Modelen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn480857245en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
233.22 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.