Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20629
Authors: 
Heineck, Guido
Schwarze, Johannes
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 1358
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes the determinants of secondary jobholding in Germany and the UK. Although differing in labor market regulations, moonlighting is a persistent phenomenon in both countries. Using panel data from the BHPS and the SOEP, reduced form participation equations are estimated for male and female workers separately. While the results vary across gender and countries, there is support for both main theoretical strands, i.e. the ?hours-constraints? motive as well as the ?heterogeneous-jobs? motive. In particular, there is evidence that particularly German workers who would like to work more hours are more likely to have a second job. On the other hand, the prospect of starting a new job is associated with moonlighting behavior of mainly British workers.
Subjects: 
labor supply
secondary jobholding
fixed effects logit estimator
Germany
UK
JEL: 
J29
J22
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
289.96 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.