EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20596
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Alisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorShields, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Stephen Wheatleyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:15:16Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:15:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/20596-
dc.description.abstractIn an influential study Case et al. (2002) documented a positive relationship between family income and child health in the US, with the slope of the gradient being larger for older than younger children. In this paper we explore the child health income gradient in England, which has a comprehensive publicly-funded National Health Service (NHS) founded on the twin principles of health care being free at the point of delivery and equality of access for the whole population. Our analysis is based on a sample of over 13,000 children (and their parents) drawn from the Health Survey for England. In accordance with Case et al. (2002), we find consistent and robust evidence of a significant family income gradient in child health using the subjective general health status measure. However, in England the size of the gradient is considerably smaller than that found for the US and we find no evidence that its slope increases with child age. We also provide new evidence that nutrition and family lifestyle choices have an important role in determining child health and that child health outcomes are highly correlated within the family. In addition, we find no evidence of an income gradient for objective indicators of child health, derived from nurse measurements and blood test results. Together our evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that the NHS has a protective effect on the health of children in England.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion paper series 1328en_US
dc.subject.jelI1en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordchild healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordincome gradienten_US
dc.subject.keywordchronic illnessen_US
dc.subject.keywordnutritionen_US
dc.subject.keywordlifestyleen_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwHaushaltseinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwErnährungen_US
dc.subject.stwLifestyleen_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwGrossbritannienen_US
dc.titleIs the Child Health / Family Income Gradient Universal? : Evidence from Englanden_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn474204995en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp1328.pdf235.67 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.