Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20576
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaint-Paul, Gillesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:15:07Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:15:07Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/20576-
dc.description.abstractThis paper uses U.S. Census data from 1990 and 2000 to provide evidence on the labormarket characteristics of European-born workers living in the US. It is found that there is apositive wage premium associated with these workers, and that the highly skilled are overrepresentedcompared with the source country, more so when one moves up the skill ladder.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion paper series |x1310en_US
dc.subject.jelJ61en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordbrain drainen_US
dc.subject.keywordmigrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordEuropeen_US
dc.subject.stwBrain Drainen_US
dc.subject.stwInternationale Arbeitsmobilitäten_US
dc.subject.stwMigrantenen_US
dc.subject.stwEuropäischen_US
dc.subject.stwLohnniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwVereinigte Staatenen_US
dc.titleThe Brain Drain : Some Evidence from European Expatriates in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn472604589en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
153.43 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.