Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20466
Authors: 
Fertig, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 1213
Abstract: 
This paper investigates whether and to what extent immigrants in Germany are integrated into German society by utilizing a variety of qualitative information and subjective data collected in the 1999 wave of the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). To this end, leisure-time activities and attitudes of native Germans, ethnic Germans and foreign immigrants of different generations are compared. The empirical results suggest that conditional on observable characteristics the activities and attitudes of foreign immigrants from both generations differ much more from those of native Germans than the activities/attitudes of ethnic Germans. Furthermore, the attitudes of second-generation immigrants tend to be characterized by a larger degree of fatalism, pessimism and self-doubt than those of all other groups, although their activities and participation in societal life resemble more those of native Germans than those of their parents? generation.
Subjects: 
subjective data
first- and second-generation immigrants
ethnic Germans
JEL: 
J61
J15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
270.28 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.