Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20447
Authors: 
Wolter, Stefan C.
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 734
Abstract: 
In this paper we analyse with the PISA data on literacy achievement of fifteen-year-old pupils in six member countries of the OECD, whether the fact of having many siblings affects the individual educational outcome. The hypothesis that we test is whether parents? resources matter for educational outcome. If they do and parents are constraint in their budgets, siblings will rival for the limited parental resources and thereby negatively affect educational outcome. The hypothesis is tested by regressing the literacy achievement on the number of siblings within a family and also by regressing directly forms of parental resources on the family size. We find significant family size effects in all six countries analysed but we also find significant differences in the effects between countries. Although sibling rivalry is relevant in all countries, it seems that some countries can compensate better than others and thereby achieve higher equity in the educational system.
Subjects: 
education
equity
parental background
family-size
PISA
JEL: 
I2
J2
D1
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
729.46 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.