EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20128
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWildasin, David E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:11:49Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:11:49Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/20128-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes some of the implications of North American labor market integration for fiscal policy. The economies of Canada and the US are both characterized by highly integrated internal markets for goods and services as well as for labor and capital, and subnational governments in both economies play an important role in the financing and provision of public goods and services, including higher education. Despite theoretical insights from traditional trade theory that suggest that ?trade and migration are substitutes?, labor markets in both the US and Canada exhibit substantial and persistent interregional migration, with gross migration rates that greatly exceed net migration rates, especially for highly-educated workers. High gross migration rates are consistent with the hypothesis that education contributes to skill-specialization and worker heterogeneity, and that mobility provides a form of insurance for investment in risky human capital. Mobility also constrains the ability of competitive governments to engage in redistributive financing of human capital investment, and recent trends in both the US and Canada reveal a diminishing level of financial support for public-sector institutions by subnational governments. The implications of labor market integration for the efficiency of resource allocation, for income determination, and for fiscal competition are important for evaluations of tax and education policies both at the subnational and at the international levels.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion paper series 889en_US
dc.subject.jelR0en_US
dc.subject.jelF2en_US
dc.subject.jelH0en_US
dc.subject.jelJ0en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordlabor market integrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordfiscal policyen_US
dc.subject.keywordmobilityen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmarkten_US
dc.subject.stwMarktintegrationen_US
dc.subject.stwInternationale Arbeitsmobilitäten_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwÖffentliche Bildungsausgabenen_US
dc.subject.stwSteuerwettbewerben_US
dc.subject.stwVereinigte Staatenen_US
dc.subject.stwKanadaen_US
dc.titleFiscal Policy, Human Capital, and Canada-US Labor Market Integrationen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn371985897en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp889.pdf483.85 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.