EconStor >
Verein für Socialpolitik >
Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer, Verein für Socialpolitik >
Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2006 (Berlin) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/19832
  
Title:Financing Agricultural Development: The Political Economy of Public Spending on Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa PDF Logo
Authors:Birner, Regina
Palaniswamy, Nethra
Issue Date:2006
Series/Report no.:Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 / Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics 4
Abstract:Acknowledging that the agricultural sector can play an important role as an engine of pro-poor growth in Sub-Saharan Africa, the purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that influence the ?political will? of governments to support this sector. The concept of ?political resources? from the political science literature is used to guide the analysis, as it combines the insights from state-centered and society-centered approaches to explain agricultural policies. Drawing on panel data covering 14 Sub-Saharan African countries over the period 1980-2001, we present empirical evidence showing that political factors play an important role in determining government?s commitment to supporting agricultural development. We use a measure of democracy that varies both across countries and within countries over time. Estimates are presented for separate samples of democracies and non-democracies, and for a pooled sample of all countries and years irrespective of the democratic status. Our results suggest that the rural poor do exercise electoral leverage in democracies; larger rural population shares are associated with higher spending on agriculture in democracies but not in authoritarian regimes. We also find evidence consistent with the theoretical prior that larger farmers tend to be better organized in interest groups. Specifically, we find that the share of traditional agricultural exports such as coffee and cocoa in the total value of exports, which may be an indicator for the ability of farmers? to organize themselves as interest groups, induces greater spending on agriculture. This result holds true for both democracies and nondemocracies.
JEL:H3
O13
H5
Q18
Document Type:Conference Paper
Appears in Collections:Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2006 (Berlin)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
Birner.pdf134.4 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/19832

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.