Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/18779
Authors: 
Hanushek, Eric Alan
Woessmann, Ludger
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working papers 1415
Abstract: 
Even though some countries track students into differing-ability schools by age 10, others keep their entire secondary-school system comprehensive. To estimate the effects of such institutional differences in the face of country heterogeneity, we employ an international differences-in-differences approach. We identify tracking effects by comparing differences in outcome between primary and secondary school across tracked and non-tracked systems. Six international student assessments provide eight pairs of achievement contrasts for between 18 and 26 cross-country comparisons. The results suggest that early tracking increases educational inequality. While less clear, there is also a tendency for early tracking to reduce mean performance. Therefore, there does not appear to be any equity-efficiency trade-off.
Subjects: 
tracking
streaming
ability grouping
selectivity
comprehensive school system
educational performance
inequality
JEL: 
I2
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
498.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.