Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/17975
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAndvig, Jens Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T15:05:19Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T15:05:19Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/17975-
dc.description.abstractThe paper discusses the impact of corruption on the probability of violent conflict events and traces theshifts in the composition of corrupt transactions during and in the aftermath of violent conflicts in aninformal way. So far there has been little interaction between empirical corruption research and theempirical research into civil wars. When the two strands of research are brought together and their resultsare combined, some patterns become apparent that would have been difficult to detect if the results withineach field were analysed in isolation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aKiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW) |cKielen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aEconomics Discussion Papers / Institut für Weltwirtschaft |x2008-3en_US
dc.subject.jelB49en_US
dc.subject.jelO17en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordCorruptionen_US
dc.subject.keywordcivil waren_US
dc.subject.keywordgovernance indicatorsen_US
dc.titleCorruption and Armed Conflicts: Some Stirring Around in the Governance Soupen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn558442935en_US
dc.rights.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/de/deed.en-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:ifwedp:6987-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
746.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.